What's the difference between integration and contract testing of microservices?



  • Well, integration testing supposed to be the testing of integrated components.

    Contract testing supposed to be testing of the way components interact with each other (API).

    But what the main difference? It seems to be the same thing! Well, okay, are checking two integrated components, example. Anyway, we make them interact with each other. But they interact via API. So, what is the difference?



  • Martin Fowler has a good article just about that

    Quoting him:

    Integration tests collect modules together and test them as a subsystem in order to verify that they collaborate as intended to achieve some larger piece of behaviour.

    While:

    Whenever some consumer couples to the interface of a component to make use of its behaviour, a contract is formed between them. This contract consists of expectations of input and output data structures, side effects and performance and concurrency characteristics.

    When the components involved are microservices, the interface is the public API exposed by each service. The maintainers of each consuming service write an independent test suite that verifies only those aspects of the producing service that are in use

    These tests are not component tests. They do not test the behaviour of the service deeply but that the inputs and outputs of service calls contain required attributes and that response latency and throughput are within acceptable limits.

    To summarize it, integrations tests are about functionality while contract tests are about the interface, or the "language" the two sides speak.

    PACT (a common contract testing framework) also have a good explanation to why Contract Tests are not Functional Tests from their point of view:

    Contract tests focus on the messages that flow between a consumer and provider, while functional tests also ensure that the correct side effects have occured.



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