Workflow between UI designer and UX conceptor



  • In some projects I have worked in the role of UI designer, with another person who worked exclusively on the concept and low-fidelity prototyping part, who sent me the low-fidelity prototypes to be stylized according to the design guidelines, to be converted on high-fidelity user interface prototypes.

    The problem I found was that, being in an Agile environment, the workload that was generated from one role to the other was excessive and to a certain extent unnecessary.

    Modifying a few sections on a lo-fi prototype takes much less time than making those modifications on an interface that is considered visually optimized and finished.

    It's frustrating to be working on all the visual details of an interface to get to the sprint on time, and the next day having to redesign all the screens almost completely. The same when the day before the sprint the "conceptor" notifies you that he has made a series of modifications, that you please implement the changes in the final UI.

    I'm not sure what the problem is, the work environment, the planning or some other factor, but it certainly made the job difficult.

    • Is the process or the communication the problem?
    • How can we solve this?


  • Over the past 20+ years, UX has swung from specialist roles to generalist, and back again, while some companies have held onto roles that worked for them. What you're describing sounds like information architect (IA) or UX architect work, which may be low fidelity but which drives a core part of design: how it works.

    I've worked at places where the IA/UX architect did flows and wires, and the UX designer/visual designer/interaction designer did interaction design, visual affordance, accessibility, branding styling, etc. Sometimes there are even more roles: editorial, content strategist, UX strategist (not an IA or wire "conceptor", but someone who creates principles and goals for design to work from and toward), taxonomist, etc. You can get a good idea of fundamental UX flow and activities from Jesse James Garrett's classic Elements of UX diagram: http://www.jjg.net/elements/pdf/elements.pdf . Everything goes from the bottom up.

    If the above is the case for you, then you and the "UX conceptor" should align on a workflow process. (You might also consider using something like Figma, which allows for things like an easy-to-use shared component library that might make changes easier in your work. Or, a living style guide if you work in code.)

    OTOH, I have worked in places where a PM or executive acted as a UX designer/architect, considering UX as a "common sense" job and themselves as the target audience. This can result in disrespect for the UX designer's work and repetitious, redundant work such as you describe. If that is the case, I would try to either work in a different department or find a new job.




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