Beginner question- font limitations



  • I am a graphic designer veering off into the world of UX design. Currently, I´m just beginner learning through courses, so please excuse my lack of knowledge in the field.

    My question pertains to the limitation of using only 2 fonts in web design. I wanted to know if it is possible to create a call to action with other font pairings which are not a part of the 2 font limitation by turning them into SVGs.
    Ex: a call to action using the fonts: Sign Painter (house script)and Rockwell (regular) turned into SVG.

    Is this frowned upon? I have seen some clothing websites which make use of other fonts in images or maybe I am being tricked by variations of the same font. Thanks in advance for your responses!



  • A limitation is not a restriction.

    The limitations are set by the designer and can be as free as he/she decides, for example how many colors there will be on a website or how many fonts.

    The restrictions are outside the decision of a professional, for example, avoid using colors similar to the background color in interactive elements, or avoid texts smaller than 5 px in the relevant information.

    In the case of the fonts to be used in a web page, they can be all possible or necessary, it only depends on the design guidelines.

    If the question is: "having a couple of official fonts, is it possible to use another one as an image in some elements"? The answer is yes, it's possible.

    If the question is: "what stylistic conditioning must be foreseen in case of using third fonts in graphic elements within the same website? The answer is a bit more complicated and here we should already talk about certain design considerations. Among others and referring to the text of similar or equal type of information in a project:

    • Avoid fonts of the same style with a different build structure: Helvetica Regular and Arial Narrow
    • Avoid fonts of the same style with different stroke modulation: Helvetica Regular and Optima
    • Avoid using fonts of the same style with different character structures: Helvetica Regular and Futura
    • Avoid using fonts of the same style but with different typographic variables depending on the case: one font for regular text and another for italics. If possible use the same font in all visual variables.

    As you can see, none of these guidelines are restrictions, but rather an open door to finding solutions without the need to make typographical leaps, for example, using a font with the greatest number of variations, always depending on the magnitude of the project.

    One last thought:

    A good graphic designer is always able to see graphic options in every limitation.


Log in to reply
 


Suggested Topics

  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2