Cannot remove Avast from Asus Zenpad 3S 10 Z500M



  • I have an Asus Zenpad 3S 10 Z500M running Android 7 and I tried Avast recently but now I can not remove it. I deactivated the admin permission but still, when I uninstall, it redirects me again to manage the admin screen.

    I tried to email support but they are very slow to reply and never give me a solution, all they knew is to deactivate the admin.



  • You could try uninstalling via ADB with adb uninstall (see our /tags/adb/info for details on ADB). The package name is the part you find in the Play Store URL of the app, following the id= parameter – for Avast that would be com.avast.android.mobilesecurity, so the complete command should be

    adb uninstall com.avast.android.mobilesecurity
    

    As it turned out (see comments below), the https://support.avast.com/en-ww/article/Uninstall-Mobile-Security/ included the required details, but one needs to take care not to miss a step. Summing up:

    • open the app
    • via the Hamburger menu (upper left corner) navigate to Settings › Uninstall App
    • enter your pin, then toggle off "turn off device administrator first"
    • now tap "uninstall app"
    • on the following screen, tap the Uninstall button and confirm.

    On the last screen mentioned, you could also try to first force-stop and clear its cache/data, as shown in https://yewtu.be/watch?v=oBbN_hVXqHI&local=1 . Also see https://yewtu.be/watch?v=ZFdBmeNW8R0 for more up-to-date visuals.


    As for the so-called "Antivirus" apps, I'd keep them off my device and rather use "brain.apk", for multiple reasons:

    • they often do more harm than good, especially with the trackers included. Avira is the best example of this, tracking you without your consent as security specialist Mike Kuketz https://www.kuketz-blog.de/avira-security-antivirus-vpn-tracking-ohne-zustimmung/ (German article) – and as you experienced yourself, removing that threat proves hard.
    • the term "Antivirus" is misleading. There are no viruses on Android (there is malware, yes, but you have to actively install it while viruses replicate themselves). So the naming is scare tactics as people using Windows think they must use such things.
    • Due to the architecture of Android, such scanners must have root privileges to be effective. As they do not, they cannot do half of what they promise: there's no heuristics, no live-activity-scanning. At best, they compare the package names (and maybe APK hashes) against some databases.
    • There's a wrong sensing of security. People let their guards down because they think themselves protected, getting reckless as they think no harm can happen.

    So with some common sense and carefulness, your protection level is much higher 🙂


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