Where an element of style may be contained



  • ♪ https://www.w3.org/TR/html5/document-metadata.html#the-style-element

    Contexts in which this element can be used: Where metadata content is expected.

    Example translation: element <style> may be held where the contents of metadata are assumed. Where are the contents of the metadata (in which elements) supposed to be? I don't think it's relevant to the elements of the contents of metadata (base link meta noscript script style template title), or somehow it's not logical.

    At the end of the specifications https://www.w3.org/TR/html5/index.html#elements-1 I think there's a lot of confusion. Where the element of style may contain the following elements: head; noscript*; flow*. Noscript understands - "In a noscript element that is a child of a head element." Is that where the flow and head came from? Why is this difference in the description of the element and the summary table at the end of the specification?

    That is, it is not clear what elements can still contain an element. <style>?



  • This is not a section. <head></head> The html paper, and the division of the two layers of paper, the logic marks (in fact html) are plain text that says "this is the beginning of the logical title, "this is the beginning of the list, etc.) and the stalk markings (this headline needs to be painted by the Verdana character of 16 picels).

    And if you see that: there's a content, there's a html strategy - that's data, then the stove mark is exactly the metadata.

    Look at the reference, the definition of metadata (Metadata content) is exactly "...is content that sets up the presentation or behavior of the rest of the content, or ..."

    Your question is not entirely precise:

    That is, it is not clear what elements might be contained. component <style>?

    To ask more correctly

    What parts of the html document can contain a style element?

    and the answer from the specification is, "in those areas where meta-data on stalk will be needed."




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