Free Timsh in The Brigmore Witches?



  • In The Knife of Dunwall, I decided to have Barrister Arnold Timsh arrested (the dastard had it coming).

    Now, I'm in Coldridge Prison and Timsh is asking me to get him out, telling me that this is the chance of my life.

    Although I'm financially self-sufficient, I guess a little extra coin couldn't hurt, but I don't really trust Timsh to uphold his end of the bargain, and I'm worried about my reputation too; also, it would be pointless to free him, if he's just going to get himself killed by the guards.

    What are the consequences of freeing Timsh? Will I have to expect retaliation from his niece, Thalia? What about Wiles Roland?
    Will Timsh ever find out it was me who sent him there in the first place?



  • Taken from the Dishonored Wiki page on Arnold Timsch:

    "Provided that he was not assassinated, Timsh later goes to prison. During his imprisonment Timsh is completely delusional about his situation. He can be witnessed threatening the guards using what he feels is his position of power and authority and can be heard shouting, "None of you understand what I can do to you. It's almost laughable isn't it? When you think about it? You're signing your own death warrant." He also threatens to add particular guards' names to a signed notarized deposition, which he has apparently sent word of to the Lord Regent's office. He is insistent that there has been a terrible mistake and that once it is cleared up he will gain control of half of the city... If Timsh is found in Coldridge Prison, Daud can use the cell controls to open his cell, allowing him to try and escape. If this is done, he will make a desperate run for the bridge before being killed by the guards, without increasing chaos for Daud."

    Although Timsh is scripted to run out and die if freed, retreating and cowering sounds standard for an alternate reaction, but no. Freeing Timsh does not have any repercussions, reputation or otherwise.


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