Is there any need of test suites for automated software testing?



  • I am doing study on software testing and I have a question. Is their any need of test suites to do automated software testing?



  • As always with testing, it depends on the situation and exactly what you mean by the question.

    If you're asking if there's ever a need to group automated tests into a suite, then yes, there are times when this is a good idea. If you want to know if it's always needed, then the answer is no - not all automation requires that automated tests be grouped into suites.

    Some other things to consider:

    • As a general rule test suites will be grouped according to the purpose they serve. A small group of tests that covers basic functionality might be used in a smoke test suite, where a set of tests covering a specific feature development will be in a different suite.
    • Where there are a large number of automated tests (not unit tests), they will often be grouped into suites so that multiple test systems can be used to run the automation in parallel. I've been at places where the number of automated tests made it necessary to do this because running all of them in succession would take over a week. By using test suites and multiple machines (mostly virtual) the test runs could be done overnight so that regressions were typically found within 24 hours of being introduced.
    • Load tests will usually be kept as a separate test suite.
    • Manual tests may also be arranged into test suites, particularly if they are used for regression or it's likely that they'll be reused at some point. While there may be an overall goal of automating the manual suites, it's not uncommon for automation to lag behind manual testing. There are also always tests that either can't be automated or aren't worth automating. These can be grouped into test suites as well.
    • No matter what your planning or automation strategy is, the number of tests you have will grow over time. Even with the best test maintenance actively pruning obsolete tests, applications grow more complex as features are added, increasing the number of tests required to cover the application to a reasonable degree (it's impossible to completely test anything with even a modest degree of complexity).


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