Who do you use/recommend for ad hoc QA testing?



  • I'm a software developer on a VERY small team (read as... me). I'm working on a large project, and in a few months think it would be beneficial to have some sort of formal QA process. I can have some internal user's access the website and use it, but end-user testing won't stress it the way QA testing does. Can anyone recommend any processes or organizations that can help me perform some Ad Hoc QA against this when the time is right? I apologize in advance if this is the incorrect forum to post this to, I'm not looking to make this a sales board, just wanted some insight from other QA people on how to go about this, thanks!



  • There are many ways to have someone "throw some testing" at your site. Which way is best for you depends on Your needs Your ability to provide input to the process Your timeframe Your budget Some folks just post something on a forum where professional testers hang out (like here, or sqaforums.com) and ask for people to "test" their site. The good: You get professional testers looking at your site. The bad: You aren't likely to get any kind of deep testing without offering some sort of compensation. Some folks ask friendly bloggers (like me) to post a link to their site, sometimes with a page explaining how to contact the site owner for further instructions/information. The good: Inexpensive. The bad: You have to do the work of weeding out the non-useful from the useful folks. Some folks use a Beta (open or closed) as a way to gain insight into the functionality and quality of their site. The good: It can be either free or very inexpensive. If you already have a wide audience, it can be quick to get many "testers". The bad: You will likely get casual users, rather than professional testers. Some folks use less-expensive organizations like uTest or others to provide testing services. The good: Relatively inexpensive. Some decent infrastructure already in place to organize and manage the testing process. The bad: A bunch of faceless testers with a wide range of abilities. If you don't provide solid input, you likely won't get much back. Some folks recruit their professional tester friends. The good: Your friends want to help you. The bad: You are imposing on their time. Many folks go and hire a professional tester for a short-duration project. The good: You get real, professional testing. The bad: More expensive, requires real work on your part. So you have to ask yourself - How serious is my need? What's it worth to me (in terms of my money and my time)?


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