Methods on boarding/teaching the team with a QA mindset



  • I'm in the process of trying to teach my team the ins and outs of Quality Assurance, but am running into some challenges distilling "QA" to its base elements. I have many years of experience that spans all areas of development, QA, Graphic Arts, Engineering, now business and marketing, and now have a small team of under 10 whom are all junior (less than 1 year of actual production experience) developers. I'm looking for some resources that break down the QA process to something they can quickly adapt and learn, ultimately to build up a skill-set over time. For myself, I'm from the era of self-taught development and learned the bulk of my understand of QA from working in a large publisher environment for many years. I am assuming it is my teaching technique (likely) or approach that is falling short in getting the team understanding why QA is important and how it fits in to development. They are workable right now, but are not yet really 'clicking' with the process and the quality of bugs reported right now are lacking. The trick, is how to pass some of this down to my team so they get the salient points first. Any chance someone here: Can point me to any online resources that get to the basics on QA? Can point me to a short-form list of best-practices in bug-reporting? Other resources that may be useful in on boarding/teaching the team with a QA mindset? perhaps connect me with someone who can help flush these out? Any help is greatly appreciated!



  • I would strongly recommend that you consider signing up your team for the Association for Software Testing's excellent BBST series. It's a great introduction to the foundational concepts they'll need to understand why we test, but will also challenge them to improve their skills at explaining and analysing their ideas about testing and expose them to discussions with a variety of testers from across the world who work in all sorts of different contexts. The course is based on the materials in the link below (which are freely available), but includes so much more, in terms of practical exercises, tutor and peer feedback, that it's well worth the (small) investment in time and money. My team signed up our (at the time) junior developer and tester, and they both enjoyed the course and learnt a lot. If you feel that you want something a bit quicker, then I'd suggest that you check out the excellent resources at http://www.testingeducation.org/BBST/ - and select a subset of those you think most relevant to your team. Start with the Foundations stuff, the videos for lectures 2 and 5 sound pretty relevant at the moment. There's also the Bug Advocacy course, but as there's a lot of material there you might want to just pick lecture 6 (writing a better bug report) as a start - it walks through a handy mnemonic (RIMGEA) that's a great set of steps to apply to your bugs.



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