Running Testing with Non-Technical Team, Little Testing Experience Myself - Where to Start?



  • I'm building a database with one other guy. He's not a developer by training, but he built version 1, and he's contracted me to help out with version 2. We're the only developers on the project.

    My boss's partner is a firm in a niche industry that doesn't have any pre-built database solutions. They commissioned version 1, and now they want a professional product that they can on-sell to the rest of their industry, so it needs a decent testing period before it can be marketed and sold.

    I'm a student programmer, I've never done the testing and release process before, and now I'm in the position of being, effectively, the QA manager. I do have some experience in beta participation and writing bug reports as an end user, but that's where my specific experience ends.

    I only have a small group of sales staff, tradesmen and managers at the firm who will be testing our database. I'll have to not only learn how to run a beta, but also how to prime them on how to test well.

    I'm looking for resources that provide a good starting point to understand this process.



  • If it's true that you "need to do some fairly thorough testing before we can sell this as a professional product.", have you considered hiring an experienced contractor?

    You could hire someone to come in and do the testing.

    Or you could hire someone to come in and do just enough training that your group of non-professional testers could get some testing done.

    Are your developers capable of lending a hand in the testing effort? Certainly, they must know something about the "requirements" as they are writing the code. Perhaps they can help testing, or coaching others?

    Aside from that, the best you can do is probably to write up the usage scenarios that you want people to explore, give them some sense of what would constitute a bug and what to do if they find one, then hope for the best.

    Do these sales folks, tradesmen, and managers understand the domain and the ideas behind the product enough to be able to distinguish "goodness" from "badness"? If so, perhaps you have a chance to spot at least a few surface-level bugs.

    Good luck.


Log in to reply
 

Suggested Topics

  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2