Human made encryption, decryption by machine



  • Now machines are super powerfull to encrypt data/messages or will be even tremendously powerfull using Quantum Computing. Machines use different ways of encryption when we give them a task to decrypt an encrypted data. Probably, they use some previous defined codes which would have been ever used or may be some new user defined codes. My question is-

    Can any machine decrypt a phrase encrypted by me?

    Take an exapmle, I made a simple code way to write something secret. I would write all English alphabet and value of some constant (say Gelfond's constant, e^π) in a series and would assign every letter a three number code corresponding to the value of constant used.

    Take a look at code numbers used!

    It is secret

    086445|086993|993779926211779445

    Or you can remove separators.

    It was an easy example. You may have tried some more complicated way that may not have been ever tried by any people in the world and wouldn't have been programmed to decrypt a data. Will a computer be able to decrypt my phrase?



  • There are two factors to consider for your broader question (the concept, not this specific encryption method - because your encryption is trivial).

    1. Schneier's Law

    Any person can invent a security system so clever that she or he can't think of how to break it.

    1. Kerckhoffs's principle

    [Encryption algorithms] should not require secrecy, and it should not be a problem if it falls into enemy hands

    If you consider that your human-made encryption algorithm's strength is that no one else knows how it was done (the algorithm), then it makes it more difficult for a machine to figure out the algorithm, but trivial for a human to learn the algorithm and train a computer to crack it.

    So, given the premise that the algorithm is knowable, any human-devised algorithm is easily cracked by a machine, regardless of how difficult it is for the creator of the algorithm to crack it.


    For your specific algorithm, it's just letter substitution. Sir Conan Doyle had the "dancing man" cypher in his Sherlock Holmes books that used the same principle and taught the world how to crack this type of "encryption" (actually, it's just an encoding). Your approach is trivial to crack, and yes, computers have pre-written libraries to crack these.



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