Do the organisational policies need to have ownership to ensure accountability?



  • Policies are the high-level statement from Senior Management. It's a philosophy for the management to be guided by, and management has the direction to plan, build, run and monitor the activities to achieve the enterprise objectives from the policies.

    Is it possible to judge/assign accountability on the policy level?

    My company hired a consultant who made the statement, and I'm looking for perspectives that will justify it.



  • Even after your comments, I'm still not sure what you are asking, but I will attempt to provide an answer.

    High-level policies are set and "owned" by Senior Management.

    Policies exist to assure that business objectives are met. Risks can affect those objectives. There are then risk owners to ensure that there is someone ultimately accountable and resourced to manage those risks.

    But there are multiple levels of policies that can apply at different layers of the business. The policies written to be closely tied to the activities that mitigate risks tend to be owned by the risk owner.

    So, it is possible to have policies that have a single, named owner, and others that are "owned" by Senior Management. Policies that set a philosophy are high-level policies and are difficult to assign accountability to.



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