Driving Changes on a peer-to-peer level



  • This site is called "Project Management". I am unsure if my current context fits.

    I am a scrum master. This means I am not "higher" or "lower" than anyone in my team.

    We work on a peer to peer level (I hope this is the matching wording). And I am new in the company.

    In the current situation there is a report which I would call "vanity metrics" (See Vanity metrics vs actionable metrics).

    If I would be the leader, I would just say. "Stop it. Don't waste time for this report".

    But I am not the leader.

    I know, that if you ask "Why do you need this report?", then the others will find a lot of reasons why they think the report is needed. The more I ask into the direction like "stop it", the more the others will think they need to defend what they did in the past.

    I think it is easier to convince people to start something new, than to convince somebody stop doing something which was done since several months. Related: Plan continuation bias

    How to drive change on a peer-to-peer level?

    Recommendations to books or articles are very welcome.



  • You can tactfully explore what changes have been made to improve the product or the team based on these metrics in the past few months. If these measurements have led to improvements or more effective decisions, they are not vanity metrics. Your newness can be a benefit here. You can say "Sorry, I'm new. Can you help me understand how the team or leadership has been using these metrics to make decisions?"

    I they are vanity metrics, you can always take the approach of "what kind of information would help you make decisions more effectively?" and get people moved onto those measures.



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